Steinmetz built unity, brought academic gravitas

URL: http://oncampus.osu.edu/steinmetz-built-unity-brought-academic-gravitas/

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Joseph Steinmetz had a tough job in front of him when he arrived at Ohio State — and scholars here say the level to which he performed his tasks only made him that much more in demand when universities around the country came looking for leaders.

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Provost to become chancellor at Arkansas

By Jeff McCallister
University Communications

Joseph Steinmetz had a tough job in front of him when he arrived at Ohio State — and scholars here say the level to which he performed his tasks only made him that much more in demand when universities around the country came looking for leaders.

Steinmetz will leave his position as Ohio State’s executive vice president and provost in early December to become chancellor at the University of Arkansas.

Executive Vice President and Provost Joseph Steinmetz

“Joe has been a dedicated scholar and administrative leader at Ohio State,” Ohio State President Michael V. Drake said. “He has led our faculty, staff and students in elevating the important work of the university and championed our efforts to balance access, affordability and excellence across the institution.

“We will miss our friend and colleague, but he leaves with our hearty congratulations and best wishes. The University of Arkansas is fortunate indeed to have Joe as its new chancellor.”

Colleagues from around Ohio State have been invited to a farewell reception in his honor at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 30 in the Performance Space at the Ohio Union.

He came to Ohio State in 2009 as vice provost for arts and sciences and, perhaps more importantly, to be the first executive dean of the then-newly united College of Arts and Sciences. With his leadership, the former five independent colleges of arts and sciences were unified into the largest arts and sciences college in the country.

“It was a big challenge we put on him to unite the five individual colleges,” said Leslie Alexander, associate professor of African American and African Studies, who served on the search committee that recruited Steinmetz.

“Not only were those colleges often very siloed and without a tremendous amount of interaction, but a lot of times they felt they were actually in competition with each other,” she said. “Uniting them required vision. He did a great job getting people to think about themselves as a single arts and sciences college.”

He continued that work and more when he was elevated to provost in 2013.

“Joe brought to that position a scholarly perspective that all of us on faculty admired,” said Tim Gerber, secretary of University Senate and professor of music. “Not only is he a fine researcher and wonderful scholar, but he made a stop at every position leading up to becoming a president or chancellor — assistant, associate and full professor, department chair, dean, vice provost, provost — and he will be a great chancellor at Arkansas.”

Before coming to Ohio State, Steinmetz was dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Kansas, where he also was a university distinguished professor. He served for 19 years at Indiana University, where he was executive associate dean for the College of Arts and Sciences and chair of the Department of Psychology. At Indiana he was also a distinguished professor of psychological and brain sciences.

Throughout his career and administrative leadership, Steinmetz has been committed to strengthening interdisciplinary research and collaborations across departments and colleges.

A nationally respected behavioral neuroscientist, Dr. Steinmetz was recognized in 1996 by the National Academy of Sciences for his contributions to the fields of experimental psychology and neuroscience. In 2012 he was named an AAAS Fellow.

“Joe brought a high level of scholarly respectability and had high expectations in terms of scholarly productivity,” Alexander said. “But at the same time, he was a pleasure to work with. It’s obvious he cares about faculty and staff, and he brings a sense of humor and enjoyment to the interactions he has with others.

“He always takes the work seriously but approaches it in a way that people enjoy it. We’re going to miss him, a lot.”

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Content type: Rss
Published: Thursday, Nov. 19 2015, 2:40pm
Imported: Thursday, Nov. 19 2015, 3:30pm
Channel: onCampus
Entity: onCampus

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